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Inside Online Learning

A Creative Approach to Career Development

Being creative isn’t just for artists, authors, and musicians. All of us can, and should, think about our careers creatively – working with the raw materials at hand to make something unique. In the context of career development, these raw materials might include your education and training accomplishments, past working experiences, interests and hobbies, volunteer […]


Connecting Course Work and the Workplace

If you are interested in furthering your career or opening up new employment options, you have something in common with many other online students. The Noel-Levitz higher education consulting group routinely reports that “future employment opportunities” are a factor for online enrollment, and new research from The Learning House [PDF] finds that two-thirds of online […]


Online Learning on a Budget

There’s no denying the price of higher education is skyrocketing and student debt is at unprecedented levels. Yet, going back to school can still mean lower unemployment and higher wages. One of my pet peeves is the assumption that online learning is a cheaper alternative to traditional programs. Sure, no dorm fees or meal plans, […]


#IOLchat Report: Inside Online Learning’s Summer Reading List

Each week we meet via Twitter for #IOLchat to discuss current issues related to online learning. Participants include students, instructors, advisors, counselors, eLearning companies, schools, publishers, and instructional designers. It’s officially summer! Many of us plan to catch up during this time of year and usually have a few projects in mind, including reading. This […]


A Closer Look at LinkedIn Premium

Have you received an email invitation to upgrade your LinkedIn account? I’m asked at least once each month if I want to purchase a premium account, often including a free 30-day trial, but never took the plunge … until now. LinkedIn is recognized as a premier site for professional social networking, and there’s good reason […]


Public Internet Access and the Online Learner

Whether it’s at the library or Starbucks, many online students study away from home for a variety of reasons, including access to hardware, software, and the Internet. I volunteer at a branch of my local public library to assist patrons with the dozen or so computers available for public use, sometimes even helping online students […]


#IOLchat Report: What Does Social Media Mean to You?

Each week we meet via Twitter for #IOLchat to discuss current issues related to online learning. Participants include students, instructors, advisors, counselors, eLearning companies, schools, publishers, and instructional designers. Mashable asked this question a couple of weeks ago and received an overwhelming response. This week, we wanted to find out what social media means to […]


A Hashtag Handbook for Online Students

If you are familiar with this blog, you probably know that Twitter is one of my favorite resources. For learners and instructors alike, Twitter can be a basic tool for networking and communication. But when I introduce Twitter to new users, including my online students, the more advanced use of hashtags seems to be a […]


#IOLchat Report: When Should Students Drop an Online Class?

Each week we meet via Twitter for #IOLchat to discuss current issues related to online learning. Participants include students, instructors, advisors, counselors, eLearning companies, schools, publishers, and instructional designers. Online students are often overscheduled – adding academic course work to employment and family responsibilities. Dropping a class can seem like an easy option to lighten […]


Referrals, References, and Letters of Recommendation

It can seem like the job search process never ends. After you prepare your resume and cover letter, and perhaps fill out job applications, there is still more to do. Referrals, references, and letters of recommendation are all significant pieces of the job search puzzle, and they all require you to ask somebody for something. […]